Wildland-Urban Interface Resources

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fire symbolThis symbol designates a fire related resource.

Research and Refereed Journal Articles

  • Fire symbolBurn patches had higher species richness and diversity than control patches. Researchers suggest the inclusion of small habitat patches in management programs and in future development plans to help conserve longleaf pine ecosystems.
    Heuberger, K. A. and F. E. Putz. 2003. Fire in the suburbs: ecological impacts of prescribed fire in small remnants of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) sandhill. Restoration Ecology 11(1): 72–81. [PDF]
  • The Big Pine partridge pea requires insect visitation for pollination. Data indicates that frequent aerial mosquito spraying and other insect predators may explain why urban-edge habitats have fewer bees visiting the Big Pine partridge pea flowers.
    Liu, H. and S. Koptur. 2003. Breeding system and pollination of a narrowly endemic herb of the lower Florida Keys: impacts of the urban-wildland interface. The American Journal of Botany 90(8): 1180–1188. [PDF]
  • fire symbolA case study describing the process of reaching agreement on landscape modifications that reduce the risk of wildland fire for interface residents in the Southeast.
    Monroe, M. C., A. J. Long, and S. Marynowski. 2003. Wildland fire in the Southeast: negotiating guidelines for defensible space. Journal of Forestry 101(3): 14–19. [PDF]
  • fire symbolSuccession allows open park-like savannas to transform into dense tall forests. The reduction of available light and space to live oak trees causes their crowns to shrink and eventually die.
    Spector, T. and F. E. Putz. 2006. Crown retreat of open-grown live oak (Quercus virginiana) due to canopy encroachment. Forest Ecology and Management 228 (2): 168–176. [PDF]
  • Resources focused outside of Florida

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Cooperative Extension and Government Publications

  • fire symbolA description of the natural fire cycles and relative wildfire hazards of nine Florida’s ecosystems commonly occurring in interface areas. Suggested steps of action to reduce the threat of fire are provided for each ecosystem.
    Behm, A. L. and M. L. Duryea. 2003. Fire in the Wildland-Urban Interface: Considering Fire in Florida’s Ecosystems (Circular 1431). Gainesville FL: School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • fire symbolA step-by-step method for determining the appropriateness of a plant for firewise landscaping around the home.
    Behm, A. L., A. J. Long, M. C. Monroe, C. K. Randall, W. C. Zipperer, and L. A. Hermansen-Baez. 2004. Fire in the Wildland-Urban Interface: Preparing a Firewise Plant List for WUI Residents (Circular 1453). Gainesville FL: School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • Conflicts fall into three categories: lifestyle issues, infrastructure, and property rights and wealth distribution.
    Clouser, R. L. 2005. Issues at the Rural-Urban Fringe: Land Use Conflicts (FE549). Gainesville FL: Department of Food and Resource Economics, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • Florida’s population will increase by approximately 12.7 million people by 2030. Infrastructure, water resources, and sustainable natural resources are a couple larger issues of concern.
    Clouser, R. L. 2006. Issues at the Rural-Urban Fringe: Will Florida be Prepared for 2030? (FE661). Gainesville FL: Department of Food and Resource Economics, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • Two-thirds of Florida’s growth will be concentrated in six areas of the state.
    Clouser, R. L. and H. Cothran. 2005. Issues at the Rural-Urban Fringe: Florida's Population Growth, 2004-2010 (FE567). Gainesville FL: Department of Food and Resource Economics, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • fire symbolA breakdown of plant flammability and what to consider when selecting landscape plants.
    Doran, J. D., C. K. Randall, and A. J. Long. 2004. Fire in the Wildland-Urban Interface: Selecting and Maintaining Firewise Plants for Landscaping (Circular 1445). Gainesville FL: School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • fire symbol This guide identifies a number of wildfire mitigation strategies that communities have found helpful to reduce the risk of wildland fire. Case studies, diagrams, photographs, list of resources, and a glossary are included.
    Florida Department of Community Affairs and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. 2004. Wildfire Mitigation in Florida: Land Use Planning Strategies and Best Development Practices. Tallahassee FL: Florida Department of Community Affairs and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
  • Explores several strategies that natural resource professionals and extension agents can use to help make communication effective.
    Monroe, M. 2007. Communication Basics in the Wildland-Urban Interface. FOR 112. School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • Citizens can discount a natural resource message when it does not correspond with what they know. Acknowledging prior knowledge, providing other explanations, introducing the new information, and providing examples of the new information in practice are qualities of a good communicator.
    Monroe, M. 2005. Addressing Misconceptions about Wildland-Urban Interface Issues. FOR 108. School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • fire symbolGuidelines to fireproofing residence include maintaining a defensible space and considering controlled burns.
    Monroe, M. and A. Long. 1999. Protecting Your Home from Forest Fires (FOR 59). Gainesville FL: School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • fire symbol Vegetation surrounding the home and types of land use around the property influence the level of risk for fire.
    Monroe, M. and A. Long. 2001. Landscaping in Florida with Fire in Mind (FOR 71). Gainesville FL: School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • Highlights for extension agents the most important elements of starting successful presentations for homeowners.
    Monroe, M. and L. Weiss 2007. Starting an Informal Presentation in the Wildland-Urban Interface. FOR 111. School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • fire symbolFactors that affect fire behavior, strategies to reduce fire risk, and examples of fire reduction will assist homeowners in improving the survivability of their homes in a wildfire.
    Randall, C.K. 2003. Fire in the Wildland-Urban Interface: Understanding Fire Behavior (Circular 1432). Gainesville FL: School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. [PDF]
  • Resources focused outside of Florida

Books, Dissertations, Reports, and Theses

  • fire symbolThe positive use of fire to restore small remnants of longleaf pine sandhill ecosystem in a suburban area. Exposure to educational materials resulted in more acceptance from the homeowners in using prescribed fire as a management tool.
    Heuberger, K. A. 1998. Fire in the Suburbs: Ecological, Social, and Legal Implications of Prescribed Fire in Remnant Longleaf Pine Sandhill. MS thesis, University of Florida.
  • Savanna landcover in Alachua County, Florida changed from about 50% to 28% over a 44 year period, with a total decline in occurrence of 44%. The reduction in cattle grazing and prescribed fire encourages succession of this ecosystem that it can not survive.
    Spector, T. 2001. Future of Open Grown Live Oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) in the South. MS thesis, University of Florida.
  • Resources focused outside of Florida

Pamphlets

  • A description of what the wildland-urban interface refers to within a community and the management challenges associated with these areas.
    Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. No date. Prescribed Fire in the Wildland Urban Interface. Tallahassee FL: Division of Forestry. [PDF]
  • fire symbolClearly marked driveways, maneuverable roads for fire vehicles, an evacuation plan, and additional tips are included in this brochure for homeowners.
    Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. No date. Woodland Home: Fire Safety. Tallahassee FL: Division of Forestry. [PDF]
  • fire symbolSafety tips to follow when smoke lowers driver’s visibility on the roadway.
    Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. No date. What to do if You Encounter Smoke on Florida’s Highways. Tallahassee FL: Division of Forestry. [PDF]
  • fire symbolReduce debris surrounding the home, maintain the electrical and heating systems, and additional tips are included in this brochure for homeowners.
    Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. No date. Mobile Home: Fire Safety. Tallahassee FL: Division of Forestry. [PDF]
  • fire symbolA door hanger providing wildfire and prescribed fire statistics and information.
    Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. No date. Good Fire, Bad Fire. Tallahassee FL: Division of Forestry. [PDF]
  • fire symbol Suggestions on ways to create a defensible space around a home to reduce the wildland fire risk.
    Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. No date. Be Firewise After the Storms. Tallahassee FL: Division of Forestry. [PDF]

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