Visit to Torreya State Park

High above the Apalachicola River, in 1833 H.B. Croom discovered a rare native conifer.  Torreya taxifolia is named for the eminent American botanist John Torrey, and the current range only extends through 3 counties on the Florida-Georgia border. It is estimated that 99% of the population has been lost in the past century, most likely from a fungal pathogen that kills the mature tree and stunts and retards new growth. No new adult trees are seen in the wild, they do not set seed and only reproduce from the stumps.

A conservation plan has been proposed that includes cultivation of seedlings, disease-free clone production from tissue culture, and continued aggressive conservation of Torreya taxilfolia in its native range. To that end, more work is needed to survey the full biodiversity of its habitat and learn what we can from studying the communities of flora, fauna and fungi that share the ecosystem of this, the rarest North American conifer. 

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