Welcome to our Amberjack Tagging Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate student, Geoff Smith, with a small, tagged AJ ready for release.

 

If you catch a tagged amberjack, please make a note of:

 

 Tag number (a four digit number): the same tag number is imprinted twice on the tag, once at the base and once at the end of the tag, along with the website and a phone number.† The phone number on the tag will still get you connected with our office, but you can also call our office directly now by calling 352-273-3601.

 

 Date and location of the capture (GPS lat and long would be great, the more accurate the location the better).† Date of recapture allows us to calculate the number of days that the fish has been alive and swimming around since it was released.† Location of capture allows us to calculate the straight-line distance that the fish has travelled since it was released.† Combined, the date and location of recapture allows us to calculate the rate of movement for individual fish.† We do not release specific recapture locations in order to protect an individualís fishing hot spots!†

 

 Measure the fish for fork length (as close as you can to the nearest mm or 1/8th inch).† Getting accurate fork lengths from recaptured fish allows us to calculate the growth rate of individual fish.

 

 Other information that helps, but is not absolutely necessary, is:

 Weight of your fish

 Is it a male or female?† This helps us to confirm our non-lethal sexing of the fish when it was released.† The information is very helpful, but the information is useful only if you are sure of the sex of the fish.† Some barely legal amberjack may be difficult to sex during certain times of the year so we donít expect everyone to be able to provide the sex of their fish.

 We will also ask you about the depth you were fishing, gear you were using, whether the fish fought well and if the tag site looked healed and healthy.† This information adds to our general knowledge of amberjack and the tagging project.† For example, released AJs have been recaptured the following day and reported as fighting well and with no redness at their tagging site.† This tells us that the fish recovered well from the previous dayís tagging (feeding and fighting) and that the tag was inserted correctly (no bleeding or tissue damage around the insertion site).

 

Please return the tag with your name, address and phone number to D. Murie, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of Florida, 7922 NW 71st Street, Gainesville, FL† 32653 OR call 352-273-3601 to report the tag.† We always call back, whether we get a phone call or a letter from you, to check about the fish and ask some of the ancillary information.

 

Fishers returning tags with date and location of recapture (minimum requirement) will be sent their choice of either a baseball cap or a travel mug with our tagging logo on it (let us know your choice). All recaptures are also entered into a quarterly random draw for a $100 cash prize, and an annual random draw for a $500 cash prize.† Happy fishers to date include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you regularly fish for AJs, please contact us and we will send you a few stamped, self-addressed envelopes and tagging information sheets that you can keep on your vessel in case you catch an AJ!† If you prefer, you can download a copy of the tagging information sheet by clicking here.

 

 

Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

 

University of Florida

GREATER AMBERJACK

Did you catch a greater amberjack that was tagged?

As part of assessing the movements of amberjack in the Gulf, AJs are currently being tagged from southern Florida to the Louisiana coast.† Fish are tagged on their left side with a yellow, external anchor tag that looks like this:†

Tag Return Reward

Name

STATE

$100

Keith L.

Maine

$100

Burden E.

Louisiana

$100

Ron M.

Florida

$100

Joe F.

Florida

$100

Dennis C.

Louisiana

$100

Greg G.

Florida

$100

Craig N.

Florida

$500

Pat G.

Louisiana

$500

Jim F.

Florida