Seven Soil Orders of Florida

1 Histosols Soils that consist of organic materials (muck or peat) in at least half of the upper 80 cm of soil, or that have organic materials extending from the surface to within 10 cm of bedrock. The organic material is more than twice as thick as any mineral soil above the bedrock. These occur extensively in Florida.
2 Spodosols Soils that have a spodic horizon: a subsurface horizon in which organic matter in combination with aluminum and/or iron has accumulated. The upper boundary of this horizon is within 2 m of the soil surface. These occur extensively in Florida.
3 Ultisols These soils have an argillic horizon: a subsurface zone of accumulation of clay-size particles at the expense of above horizons. Base saturation* is less than 35%. These occur extensively in Florida. 
4 Mollisols Soils that have a thick (more than 25 cm) dark, mineral surface horizon and a base saturation of 50% or more. These occur to a minor extent in Florida.
5 Alfisols Other soils that have an argillic horizon and a base saturation of 35% or more. These occur to a moderate extent in Florida.
6 Inceptisols Other soils that have significant horizon development. These occur to a minor extent in Florida.
7 Entisols Other soils which occur extensively in Florida, especially south Florida rocklands and sandhills.
  

From Myers and Ewel, 1990

* Base Saturation: the proportion of chemical exchange sites on soil particles that are occupied by basic cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+) as opposed to acid cations (H30+, Al3+).  These basic cations are important sources of nutrients for plants.